Contract Examples

Preliminary Notes

To verify the following examples use:
1
zebra -v Filename.fst
Copied!
To elaborate and verify the elaborated result use:
1
zebra -e Filename.fst
Copied!
The elaborated file will appear within the output subdirectory of your current directory.
In order for most of the examples to work you need to add the following lines at the beginning of your code:
1
open Zen.Cost
2
3
let main txSkeleton _ _ _ _ _ _ _ = Zen.ContractResult.ofTxSkel txSkeleton
4
5
let cf _ _ _ _ _ _ _ = ret #nat 4
Copied!

Simple Example

Let's create a simple function which takes a function and an argument and applies the function on the argument:
1
val applyOnce (#a #b:Type): (a -> b) -> a -> b
2
let applyOnce #_ #_ f x = f x
Copied!
Elaborating the function will yield the following:
1
val applyOnce: #a: Type -> #b: Type -> (a -> b) -> a -> b
2
let applyOnce #_ #_ f x = inc 1 (f x)
Copied!
That's because function application (f x) has a cost of 1, which is embedded into the let-expression with inc.
However - trying to compile this function will result in a typing error
  • because you can only apply inc on a value of a
    cost type.
To fix it we modify the function to use ret on the result, to lift it into the cost monad, and we change the type signature to return a cost type (with a cost of 0 since that is the cost ret gives):
1
val applyOnce (#a #b:Type): (a -> b) -> a -> cost b 0
2
let applyOnce #_ #_ f x = ret (f x)
Copied!
Now elaborating the function will yield the following:
1
val applyOnce (#a #b:Type): (a -> b) -> a -> cost b 0
2
let applyOnce #_ #_ f x = inc 2 (ret (f x))
Copied!
That's because now we have 2 applications, one of f on x, and the other of ret on the result.
Now the compilation would still fail with a typing error:
1
Subtyping check failed; expected type Zen.Cost.Realized.cost _ 0; got type Zen.Cost.Realized.cost _ (0 + 2)
Copied!
That's because while the declared cost is 0, the inferred cost (due to the addition of inc 2) is 2.
To fix that we now have to declare the correct cost within the type, to account for the increment, so cost b 0 becomes cost b 2:
1
val applyOnce (#a #b:Type): (a -> b) -> a -> cost b 2
2
let applyOnce #_ #_ f x = inc 2 (ret (f x))
Copied!
Now that the syntactic cost is accounted for the program will compile.

Aggregated Syntactic Cost

The following function takes a function f and an argument x and applies f on x and then applies it again on the result:
1
val applyTwice (#a:Type): (a -> a) -> a -> a
2
let applyTwice #_ f x = f (f x)
Copied!
Elaborating this function will yield the following:
1
val applyTwice (#a:Type): (a -> a) -> a -> a
2
let applyTwice #_ f x = inc 2 (f (f x))
Copied!
The increment by 2 is due to the fact there are 2 applications.
Again - this format won't do, and to be able to compile the elaborated program we have to lift the result into the cost monad and account for the additional costs:
1
val applyTwice (#a:Type): (a -> a) -> a -> cost a 3
2
let applyTwice #_ f x = ret (f (f x))
Copied!
which will be elaborated as:
1
val applyTwice: #a: Type -> (a -> a) -> a -> cost a 3
2
let applyTwice #_ f x = inc 3 (ret (f (f x)))
Copied!
Notice that this time we've predicted the increased elaborated cost in advance, so the original code won't compile (since ret gives a cost of 0) while the elaborated code will (since it will add inc 3 to account for the costs of all the function applications).
In practice - you won't be able to modify the elaborated code, since the elaboration is done automatically when activating a contract, so instead you need to elaborate it locally, look at the result, and then modify the original code so it would compile right after the elaboration.

Multiple Clauses

Now let's create another function - which takes a boolean b, a function f, and another argument x, and applies f on x once if b is true or twice if b is false.
We'll use the previously defined functions to do so:
1
val onceOrTwice (#a:Type): bool -> (a -> a) -> a -> cost a ?
2
let onceOrTwice #_ b f x = if b then applyOnce f x else applyTwice f x
Copied!
What should be the declared cost of this function?
applyOnce gives a cost of 2, while applyTwice gives a cost of 3, so we have a collision of costs.
To reconcile the collision we manually insert inc 1 to the applyOnce f x clasue to account for the difference between the costs, which would give both clauses of the if-then-else a cost of 3:
1
val onceOrTwice (#a:Type): bool -> (a -> a) -> a -> cost a 3
2
let onceOrTwice #_ b f x = if b then inc 1 (applyOnce f x) else applyTwice f x
Copied!
However - we still need to account for the syntactic cost of the onceOrTwice function itself - to do so we first elaborate the function, which gives us:
1
val onceOrTwice (#a:Type): bool -> (a -> a) -> a -> cost a 3
2
let onceOrTwice #_ b f x = inc 7 (if b then inc 1 (applyOnce f x) else applyTwice f x)
Copied!
That is beacuse the then clause has 4 applications, while the else clause has 3, and since the syntactic cost of an if-then-else is defined as 3 + the maximal syntactic cost out of both clauses, which is 4 in this case, we get a total syntactic cost of 7, which is embedded with an inc 7 into the let-expression.
Now to account for the additional cost of 7 we change the declared cost of the function to 10:
1
val onceOrTwice (#a:Type): bool -> (a -> a) -> a -> cost a 10
2
let onceOrTwice #_ b f x = inc 7 (if b then inc 1 (applyOnce f x) else applyTwice f x)
Copied!
The elaborated code will now compile.

Composition

Let's define 2 simple functions on the natural numbers - a function which takes a number and doubles it and a function which adds 7 to a number:
1
val double : nat -> nat
2
let double x = 2 * x
3
4
val add7 : nat -> nat
5
let add7 x = x + 7
Copied!
We'll also define a function foo which would first double a number and then add 7 to the result, by composing the above functions:
1
val foo : nat -> nat
2
let foo x = add7 (double x)
Copied!
The code will compile just fine, but not the elaboration.
To pass the elaboration we need to make sure all the functions are costed by lifting the results into the cost monad:
1
val double : nat -> cost nat 0
2
let double x = ret (2 * x)
3
4
val add7 : nat -> cost nat 0
5
let add7 x = ret (x + 7)
Copied!
What about foo? trying to simply compose add7 and double and lifting the result will now fail to typecheck:
1
val foo : nat -> cost nat 0
2
let foo x = ret (add7 (double x))
Copied!
That's because we've changed the return type of the functions, so to compose them we have to use the bind operator (>>=):
1
val foo : nat -> cost nat 0
2
let foo x = ret x >>= double >>= add7
Copied!
Now elaboration would still fail, so we have to account for the syntactic cost as well - let's look at the elaborated code:
1
val double: nat -> cost nat 0
2
let double x = (inc 3 (ret (2 * x)))
3
4
val add7: nat -> cost nat 0
5
let add7 x = (inc 3 (ret (x + 7)))
6
7
val foo: nat -> cost nat 0
8
let foo x = (inc 5 (ret x >>= double >>= add7))
Copied!
By looking at the incs we know that the cost of both double and add7 is 3, so we modify their types in the original code:
1
val double : nat -> cost nat 3
2
let double x = ret (2 * x)
3
4
val add7 : nat -> cost nat 3
5
let add7 x = ret (x + 7)
Copied!
What is the cost of foo? trying to simply give it a cost of 5 will fail:
1
val foo: nat -> cost nat 5
2
let foo x = (inc 5 (ret x >>= double >>= add7))
Copied!
That's because we now have to take the costs of double and add7 into account as well.
Recall that the type of the bind operator is: cost a m -> (a -> cost b n) -> cost b (m+n), so it sums up the costs, which means that's exactly what we have to do.
Since the cost of double is 3, the cost of add7 is 3, and the syntactic cost of foo is 5, adding them all together gives us a cost of 11:
1
val foo: nat -> cost nat 11
2
let foo x = (inc 5 (ret x >>= double >>= add7))
Copied!
Now the elaborated code will compile.

Recursion

The cost analysis becomes more complex once you introduce recursion.
The following function computes the factorial of a natural number:
1
val fact: nat -> int
2
let rec fact m =
3
match m with
4
| 0 -> 1
5
| _ -> m * fact (m - 1)
Copied!
Trying to elaborate this function will fail, since it doesn't return a cost type.
1
val fact: nat -> int
2
let rec fact m =
3
inc 7
4
(match m with
5
| 0 -> 1
6
| _ -> m * fact (m - 1))
Copied!
To make sure the result is of a cost type - we apply ret on the base case, and bind the recursion step:
1
let rec fact m =
2
match m with
3
| 0 -> ret 1
4
| _ -> fact (m - 1) >>= (fun r -> ret (m * r))
Copied!
We might prefer to use some syntactic sugar to make the code look nicer:
1
let rec fact m =
2
match m with
3
| 0 -> ret 1
4
| _ -> let! r = fact (m - 1)
5
in ret (m * r)
Copied!
What should be the return type of the new function? we can start with cost int 0:
1
val fact: nat -> cost int 0
2
let rec fact m =
3
match m with
4
| 0 -> ret 1
5
| _ -> let! r = fact (m - 1)
6
in ret (m * r)
Copied!
Now the elaborated code will not compile, but it will give us some hints on how to specify the cost correctly:
1
val fact: nat -> cost int 0
2
let rec fact m =
3
inc 10
4
(match m with
5
| 0 -> ret 1
6
| _ -> let! r = fact (m - 1)
7
in ret (m * r))
Copied!
We might be tempted to assign a cost of 10 to the function, but that won't do - if the cost of fact is 10 then fact (m - 1) will have a cost of 10 and after accounting for the incremented syntactic cost (which is added by inc 10) we'll get that the actual cost of the function is 20.
In fact - assuming any constant cost will yield a contradiction, since we'll always get another 10 steps added to what we've started with, which indicates that it is impossible to assign a constant cost to the function.
How do we resolve it? by making the cost parametric in the size of the input, by using dependent types.
First we explicitly declare the name of the input parameter in the type:
1
val fact: (m:nat) -> cost int 0
Copied!
Then we can use this name within the cost expression, for example like this:
1
val fact: (m:nat) -> cost int m
Copied!
But this won't do - we have to figure out the actual dependency of the cost on the parameter.
Let's assume for now the cost is some function fact_c on m:
1
val fact: (m:nat) -> cost int (fact_c m)
Copied!
Looking at the definition of fact again - we immediately see a problem - the cost of ret 1 is always 0, while the cost of fact (m-1) is fact_c (m-1), which can't be 0, so we have 2 pattern matching clauses with different costs.
This will result in a typing error when we try to compile the code, since all clauses of a match-with must return a result of the same type.
To fix that we need to add the difference to the first clause, like this (notice this is a modification of the original code, not the elaborated code):
1
val fact: (m:nat) -> cost int (fact_c m)
2
let rec fact m =
3
match m with
4
| 0 -> inc (fact_c (m-1)) (ret 1)
5
| _ -> let! r = fact (m-1)
6
in ret (m * r)
Copied!
Instead of using ret and then inc we can just use incRet, which combines the 2:
1
val fact: (m:nat) -> cost int (fact_c m)
2
let rec fact m =
3
match m with
4
| 0 -> incRet (fact_c (m-1)) 1
5
| _ -> let! r = fact (m-1)
6
in ret (m * r)
Copied!
Now we have to figure out what fact_c is.
Since the elaborator adds 10 to the cost, and this value didn't change with the addition of the incRet to the first clause (since the total syntactic cost for a match-with is determined only by the syntactically heaviest clause, which is still the second clause), we get 10 added to the cost with each call to the function, which means that the base case has at least a cost of 10, and with each recursion step another 10 is added, so we get the following recurrence relation:
1
fact_c m = 10 + fact_c (m - 1)
Copied!
What is the base case (for m = 0)?
Since we know it is at least 10 (since the cost is increased by 10 and it can never be decreased), we can try assigning it to be 10, which gives us the solution:
1
fact_c m = 10 * (m + 1)
Copied!
So let's try it:
1
val fact: (m:nat) -> cost int (10 * (m+1))
2
let rec fact m =
3
match m with
4
| 0 -> incRet (10 * m) 1
5
| _ -> let! r = fact (m-1)
6
in ret (m * r)
Copied!
Now the function is elaborated to:
1
val fact: m: nat -> cost int (10 * (m + 1))
2
let rec fact m =
3
inc 10
4
(match m with
5
| 0 -> incRet (10 * m) 1
6
| _ -> let! r = fact (m - 1) in ret (m * r))
Copied!
The program now compiles successfully, which indicates that the cost is now correct.
The keen-sighted reader will notice that the first clause incRet (10 * m) 1 is operationally equivalent to ret 1, since the only case in which this clause is executed is when m = 0, but since all clauses must return a result of the same type, no matter if they are executed or not, the only way to pass the type checker is by explicitly handling the cost for all possible values of m.
Last modified 2mo ago